University of Hawaiʻi System News https://www.hawaii.edu/news News from the University of Hawaii Fri, 20 Nov 2020 00:44:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-UHNews512-1-32x32.jpg University of Hawaiʻi System News https://www.hawaii.edu/news 32 32 UH collaboration preps students for engineering careers https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/19/collaboration-preps-students-engineering-careers/ Fri, 20 Nov 2020 00:40:36 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130920 The partnership has resulted in two industry-integrated courses and use of a metal 3D printer.

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Exterior of Holmes Hall

An unveiling ceremony is set for November 2020 for a cutting-edge, $250,000 Markforged Metal X 3D printer at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa College of Engineering. This is part of a partnership with the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PHNSY and IMF) that began in 2018 and continues to grow and provide more opportunities for engineering students.

The printer, purchased by the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) for educational and research purposes, is part of a three-year joint-use agreement allowing students and faculty to fabricate custom small metal parts for use in research and senior design projects. This also affords Navy personnel the ability to manufacture replacement parts, especially those that have long lead times or are obsolete, such as metal flanges, valves, brackets and filter housings.

Partnership accomplishments

Two industry-integrated courses have created pathways for students to jumpstart their careers. Launched in fall 2018, Mechanical Engineering (ME) 491 Pearl Harbor Internship gives students the chance to gain real-world engineering experience by working alongside Pearl Harbor engineers. The course, taught by Adjunct Professor Marvin Young, accepts seven to eight students each semester and quickly fills up. It allows budding engineers the unique opportunity to work on a critical project in a classified, secure environment, mentored by a supervisor, many of whom are UH graduates.

“I learned a lot about what it was like working at the shipyard,” said Tarah Aniya, a senior who completed the course last spring. “I got the opportunity to work together with different codes and shops so I was able to experience the different working environments at the shipyard. I also built good relationships with my mentors and other shipyard workers, which was great because I feel like it helped to open doors for me at the shipyard should I decide to work there after graduation.”

Young added that more than 50% of the students who have taken the class have been hired as full-time employees.

The second course, ME 481/482 Senior Design Project, is a year-long capstone course in its first year that requires students to tackle non-classified projects by PHNSY and IMF, identifying the problem focus in the first stage and building a prototype in the second. This year’s class, taught by Professor Mehrdad Nejhad, is divided into two teams—one focused on 3D printing and the other working in robotics. PHNSY and IMF is providing additional support to students with materials and machinery, producing parts for the project based on drawings the students provide.

Future project

A collaboration under development with UH, PHNSY and IMF, and the University of Guam (UOG), will provide UOG students with a GPA of 3.0 or higher the ability to transfer to UH Mānoa’s mechanical engineering program in their junior year. They will also be encouraged to enroll in the Pearl Harbor internship course and will be eligible to apply for paid work at PHNSY and IMF, with the hope that they will convert to full-time employees. This arrangement will help bring more diversity to the classroom and serve as an important recruiting tool for NAVSEA’s support of maintenance in Guam.

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2021 optimism, UH Mānoa reorganization: President’s November report https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/19/presidents-november-report-2020/ Fri, 20 Nov 2020 00:36:45 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130914 Highlights include spring 2021 plans, UH Mānoa reorganization, extramural funding and more.

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University of Hawaiʻi President David Lassner made his report to the Board of Regents at their meeting on November 19, 2020.

Highlights include:

View previous reports to the board.

artist rendering of C I P
Culinary Institute of the Pacific render

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$1M gift expands team-based health education at UH https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/19/interprofessional-education-gift/ Thu, 19 Nov 2020 21:26:51 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130848 HMSA Foundation has committed $1 million to support the statewide expansion of Interprofessional Education at >UH and to establish the endowed HMSA Distinguished Professorship to advance the Hawaiʻi Interprofessional Education program.

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UH Mānoa and UH Hilo students on TV screen smiling
Hawaiʻi Interprofessional Team Collaboration Simulation with UH Mānoa nursing, medical and social work students, and UH Hilo College of Pharmacy students (on TV screen).

Health care leaders here at home and around the world recognize that teamwork is critical to the delivery of safe patient care while recognizing that such efforts do not come naturally to health sciences students or practitioners who are trained with distinctly different philosophical worldviews to meet specific roles. Anchored by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene’s UH Translational Health Science Simulation Center (THSSC), the Hawaiʻi Interprofessional Education (HIPE) program prepares UH health sciences students for team-based practice to improve health care quality and value in Hawaiʻi.

Team-based learning will translate into safe, quality care for our community.
—Mary G. Boland, UH Mānoa Nursing Dean

HMSA Foundation has committed $1 million to support the statewide expansion of Interprofessional Education (IPE) at UH and to establish the endowed HMSA Distinguished Professorship in IPE to provide the leadership, expertise and research needed to implement and advance the HIPE program. This gift will create an infrastructure that supports and coordinates innovative experiential team-based learning experiences, while supporting the expansion of the IPE program and building on the past successes of HIPE.

“This initiative is aligned with HMSA’s mission to create a healthier Hawaiʻi,“ said HMSA President and CEO Mark Mugiishi. “The transition to focus on team-based care will lead to improved patient safety and care, which will ultimately transform our health care system.”

“We are grateful for HMSA Foundation’s commitment to enhancing interprofessional education for UH students. Team-based learning will translate into safe, quality care for our community,” said Mary G. Boland, dean and professor of UH Mānoa’s School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene. “Our UH students will be better practitioners with the skills needed to work together in the constantly changing and dynamic healthcare landscape.”

Preparing students for team-based practice

The World Health Organization defines interprofessional education as when students from two or more professions learn about, from and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes. Students from the UH Mānoa School of Nursing and Dental Hygiene, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work, Office of Public Health Studies, UH Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy, and other UH health professions participate in HIPE learning experiences. The mission of the HIPE program is to prepare all health profession students to collaborate in teams to provide a safe, effective and sustainable patient/consumer-centered and community/population oriented health care system.

UH Manoa nursing students work with simulated patient
Teleport activity with UH Mānoa Nursing students working with robot operated by UH Hilo College of Pharmacy students.
UH Hilo pharmacy students operate robot through teleport
UH Hilo College of Pharmacy students on the other side of the teleport activity.

“Interprofessional education has taught me that while I will have a specific role as a pharmacist, I will be able to partner with my colleagues in other professions so we can build on the strengths of each other to provide patient care,” said Josephine K.S. McDonald, a UH Hilo College of Pharmacy student pharmacist. “By working together, we can provide our patients with optimal care.”

The demand for effective teamwork and collaboration is growing very rapidly and there is a sense of urgency, beyond national accreditation requirements, to prepare students for team-based practice to improve healthcare quality and value. Building capacity in teamwork and collaboration is a key to transforming the delivery of healthcare.

Since 2016, the HIPE program has delivered year-round technology supporting simulated learning experiences to prepare students for team-based practice. The IPE curriculum is built on the Interprofessional Collaboration Core Competency model and provides a clear path for the involvement of nursing, pharmacy and medicine, with social work and public health to focus on the overall improvement of health for the people of Hawaiʻi.

“As a practicing nurse, the interprofessional education I received from UH reinforced the idea that I have resources available to me and alleviates the pressure of feeling like I have to know everything,” said Dennis Ho, a UH Mānoa Nursing master’s degree student. “The interprofessional learning opportunities at UH gave me the experience and tools to effectively operate within a patient-centered care team.”

With the expansion of the HIPE program, UH plans to create a statewide advisory committee comprised of the UH health care professional schools and allied health programs, community representatives and local health care agencies.

Interprofessional education at UH is anchored at the UH Translational Health Science Simulation Center. Support UH interprofessional education by making your fast, secure online donation.

For inquiries about giving to UH Mānoa Nursing, please contact Karla Zarate-Ramirez, associate VP, Major Gifts at (808) 956-2906 or email Karla.Zarate-Ramirez@uhfoundation.org.

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Nearly $1M to boost COVID-19 testing for Pacific Islander communities https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/19/boost-covid-test-pacific-islanders/ Thu, 19 Nov 2020 20:45:35 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130908 The National Institutes of Health funding will help develop culturally resonant strategies to promote testing in Hawaiʻi and in Guam.

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coronavirus

The University of Hawaiʻi has received nearly $1 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) towards developing and evaluating community engagement strategies meant to help increase COVID-19 testing and to better understand the infection patterns among non-Native Hawaiian Pacific Islanders in Hawaiʻi and Guam. These culturally tailored strategies will be disseminated to the Pacific Islander communities in their native languages.

Across the U.S., Pacific Islanders have among the highest rates of contracting and succumbing to COVID-19. Locally, they represent only 4% of Hawaiʻi’s population, but account for nearly 30% of COVID-19 cases and 20% of all COVID-19 deaths. They also suffer from multiple medical conditions known to increase the risk of having severe COVID-19 symptoms. In addition, many Pacific Islanders tend to have poor access to health care, lack adequate health insurance, live in multi-generational housing and work in service jobs that increase their daily risk exposure. On Guam, COVID-19 cases have spiked among indigenous Chamoru and immigrant Micronesians.

The NIH’s Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) initiative is meant to accelerate the development, commercialization and deployment of innovative technologies for COVID-19 testing. A major component of this initiative is the RADx Underserved Populations (RADx-UP) program, which is focused on identifying factors associated with the disproportionately high infection rates and poor outcomes of COVID-19 in underserved and vulnerable populations, and to reduce disparities in COVID-19 morbidity and mortality in these communities who are most at risk during the pandemic.

The project key personnel from UH include Richard Yanagihara, Angela Sy, Wei-Kung Wang, Tina Tauasosi-Posiulai, Chatura Siriwardhana and Neal Palafox of UH Mānoaʻs John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM), and Kevin D. Cassel of the UH Cancer Center.

“This will be one of the first NIH-supported projects designed to sustain efforts not only for COVID-19 mitigation among Pacific Islanders, but for achieving the capacity and collective partnerships among Pacific Islanders to reach long-term goals of reducing long-standing health disparities,” said JABSOM Professor Yanagihara, principal investigator.

A multidisciplinary effort

Puipuia le Ola, which is Samoan for “protecting life,” represents a transdisciplinary partnership between UH Mānoa, the University of Guam, Kalihi-Palama Health Center, the Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander COVID-19 Response, Recovery, Resilience Team (COVID 3R), Hawaiʻi Public Housing Authority, Hawaiʻi Affordable Housing, Inc., the American Samoa government and multiple community-based organizations including the Marshallese Community Organization of Hawaiʻi, First Samoan Congregational Christian Church of Honolulu and Pacific Resources for Education and Learning.

“This grant provides a rare, but much-needed opportunity for community-based organizations which serve Pacific Islanders in Hawaiʻi and Guam to have the resources to collaborate in health education and outreach to increase COVID-19 testing uptake,” said JABSOM Assistant Professor Sy.

The multidisciplinary team of scientific researchers, clinicians and Pacific Islander community leaders, all with decades of commitment to progressing the health of this group will provide the expertise for this project—the first of its kind.

Read more on the JABSOM website.

Pacific Islander dancer
Candace Lotomau of Hawaii participated in an Asian American-Pacific Islander Herritiage Month observance in May 2018. (Photo credit: Lori Egan)

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TikTok challenge promotes multi-language COVID-19 messaging https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/19/tiktok-challenge-multi-language/ Thu, 19 Nov 2020 20:13:50 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130894 To provide COVID-19 information in Ilocano, Marshallese, Chamorro, ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi and other languages, public health ambassadors are creating videos.

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tiktok challenge

To provide COVID-19 information and recommendations in Ilocano, Marshallese, Chamorro, ʻōlelo Hawai‘i and other languages, a group of young public health ambassadors are creating videos to help keep Hawaiʻi healthy during the pandemic. The effort arose from the Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander COVID-19 Response, Recovery, and Resilience Team, and is supported by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Office of Public Health Studies, Papa Ola Lōkahi and the Hawaiʻi State Department of Health.

The TikTok-style video challenge was launched by Next Gen Hawaiʻi, a collaboration of organizations involved in the state’s COVID-19 response efforts.

Many UH Mānoa public health students and graduates have participated.

“The public health ambassadors bring creative energy to public health messaging around topics such as mask wearing, staying together over distances and flu shots,” said Tetine Sentell, director of the Office of Public Health Studies.

“They are social influencers with important information to share. We believe this is key to leveraging community strengths and trusted relationships within intergenerational households to promote well-being and healthy behaviors during this stressful time,” Sentell added.

Next Gen Hawaiʻi

Next Gen Hawaiʻi public health ambassadors are teens and young adults who create social media content focused on public health awareness and resources in multiple languages spoken in Hawaiʻi. For the remainder of 2020, Next Gen Hawaiʻi will host two TikTok challenges monthly, which will be shared widely.

“The goal of the Next Gen Hawaiʻi project is to amplify voices of the youth of Hawaiʻi in their languages to support better health in their communities, especially in Pacific Islander, Native Hawaiian, and other communities that have been so impacted by COVID-19,” said Momi Tolentino, communications and community relations assistant at Papa Ola Lōkahi, who is helping run the program.

“We want to bolster health, a sense of belonging, and in-language outreach to Hawaiʻi communities during COVID-19,” Tolentino added.

For more information about Next Gen Hawaiʻi, email hawaiinextgen@gmail.com.

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$5M award aids search for a ‘recipe’ for habitable worlds https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/19/award-for-recipe-habitable-worlds/ Thu, 19 Nov 2020 18:00:46 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130875 Researchers will trace the volatile elements that form the atmospheres of planets, establishing a scientific foundation for detecting the signatures of life on other worlds.

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illustration of the journey of volatiles
Cover art illustrating the journey of volatiles from interstellar gas and dust thence into star-forming clouds, protoplanetary disks, and finally planets and their atmospheres. (Photo credit: Dina Clark/UCSC)

To trace the volatile elements that form the atmospheres of planets, NASA’s Astrobiology Program awarded a five-year, $5-million grant to an interdisciplinary consortium, including researchers at the University of Hawaiʻi. The award will help establish a scientific foundation for detecting the signatures of life on other worlds.

The research targets elements and molecules such as nitrogen, water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen and methane that are often found in planetary atmospheres. These are commonly called “volatiles,” and many are essential to the development of life.

The team is led by Natalie Batalha at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), and is one of eight new research teams selected by NASA to inaugurate its Interdisciplinary Consortia for Astrobiology Research (ICAR) program. The UH collaborators are Eric Gaidos in the Department of Earth Sciences, Bin Chen, Elena Dobrica and Gary Huss in the Hawaiʻi Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, and Dan Huber and Jonathan Williams at the Institute for Astronomy. In addition to UH and UCSC, the consortium includes researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder, University of Kansas and NASA Ames Research Center.

“My UH colleagues and I look forward to contributing to this multi-disciplinary investigation that will answer two big questions. First, how did the Earth get its volatile elements, and, second, can we find habitable planets with similar volatiles around other stars?” explained UH Mānoa astrobiologist Gaidos.

The research will include observations of the formation of planetary systems and habitable planets around other stars, as well as laboratory research on volatiles in the solar system.

Gaidos added, “Here in Hawaiʻi we are fortunate to have at our disposal both telescopes to observe distant planet-hosting stars, and microscopes to study meteorites and samples returned from space. These, and laboratory experiments to simulate the processes affecting volatiles, are crucial pieces of this puzzle.”

Potentially habitable worlds

A recent analysis of data from NASA’s highly successful Kepler Mission, which discovered more than 2,500 exoplanets, suggests there are at least 300 million potentially habitable worlds in our galaxy. But Batalha noted that a planet in the “habitable zone” of its star (where liquid water could pool on the planet’s surface) does not necessarily have all the conditions needed for life.

“There may be planets with liquid water on the surface that are dead,” said Batalha, who served as Kepler project scientist. “One of the messages from the Kepler Mission was that the diversity of exoplanets far exceeds the diversity of our own solar system. If we want to understand the diversity of rocky planets in habitable zones, we have to study the physical processes that sculpt them.”

‘Following the volatiles’

For this team, that means “following the volatiles,” tracing the path of the volatile elements such as carbon and oxygen that make up a planet’s atmosphere. That path goes from star-forming clouds into protoplanetary disks, to the building blocks of planets, and eventually into the planets themselves, where volatile elements can move between the surface, atmosphere and interior, and even be lost to space.

The researchers will address four fundamental questions: What is the inventory of volatiles in planetary building blocks? Where do volatiles come from, and where do they go? How are volatiles distributed between a planet’s interior, surface and atmosphere? And what can atmospheric observations tell us about the volatile inventories and chemistries of exoplanets?

The launch of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in 2021 will usher in a new era of exoplanet exploration and the characterization of exoplanet atmospheres. The consortium will develop the tools needed to interpret observations of exoplanet atmospheres made by JWST and the latest generation of ground-based telescopes.

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UH, Stanford will play 4-game football series https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/18/uh-stanford-4-game-football-series/ Thu, 19 Nov 2020 00:02:37 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130851 UH and Stanford University will meet on the football field for the first time in more than 50 years when the schools begin a four-game series starting in 2023.

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Manoa Stanford football series

The University of Hawaiʻi and Stanford University will meet on the football field for the first time in more than 50 years when the schools begin a four-game series starting in 2023.

The series opener is scheduled for September 1, 2023 in Honolulu followed by another match-up in Hawaiʻi on August 23, 2025. The series shifts to northern California in 2026 (August 29) and 2030 (August 31) in Stanford.

Stanford won all three previous meetings, all of which were played in Honolulu. The last time the teams met was December 2, 1972 with the Cardinal prevailing 39–7 at Honolulu Stadium. The first match-up was also the closest margin as Stanford won 18–7 on December 23, 1946. The teams met four years later in the Pineapple Bowl on January 2, 1950 with Stanford taking it, 74–20.

To accommodate the Stanford game in 2023, UH’s match-up with Albany that season was moved to September 9. The non-conference schedule is complete with home games against Stanford, Albany and New Mexico State (September 23) and road games at Vanderbilt (August 26) and Oregon (September 16).

For more go to the UH Mānoa Athletics website.

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Book introduces students to how fashion ‘works’ https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/18/book-explains-how-fashion-works/ Wed, 18 Nov 2020 20:39:47 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130830 It is designed to help students quickly get up-to-speed with fashion theories, from scarcity to conformity, through clear practical examples and case studies.

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book cover

How does a style become a fashion? Why do trends spread and decline? For the beginner student, Introducing Fashion Theory: From Androgyny to Zeitgeist is a one-stop resource that covers theories of fashion and appearance behaviors from the perspectives of fashion businesses, individuals, society and culture.

Authored by University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Fashion Design and Merchandising Program (FDM) Professor Andy Reilly, it is the second edition of an earlier book, Key Concepts for the Fashion Industry, that was widely adopted by fashion courses. This newly released version has been revised and updated, including expanded coverage on cultural appropriation, corporate greenwashing, and the criminal world of counterfeit goods. It is designed to help students quickly get up to speed with fashion theories, from scarcity to conformity, through clear practical examples and case studies.

male
Andy Reilly

“I use this book in my FDM 101 course, ‘Introduction to the Fashion Industry,’” said Reilly. “I wrote it because I wanted something that effectively and efficiently explains how fashion ‘works’ from different perspectives, appropriate for the beginning level study. I’m glad students across the country found the first version useful, and I hope this update is equally well received.”

Professor Nancy Rabolt of San Francisco State University added, “Using historic, cultural, and current fashion examples, Introducing Fashion Theory helps explain our everyday clothing habits and the paradoxical nature of fashion.”

Introducing Fashion Theory: From Androgyny to Zeitgeist will soon be available from Bloomsbury Publishing, as well as on Amazon, Brookline Booksmith, GoodReads and others.

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Fish carcasses deliver toxic pollution to deepest ocean trenches https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/18/toxic-pollution-deepest-ocean/ Wed, 18 Nov 2020 18:00:13 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130744 Researchers found sinking carcasses of fish from near-surface waters deliver toxic mercury pollution to the most remote and inaccessible parts of the world’s oceans.

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snailfish
A snailfish collected from the Kermadec Trench in the southwest Pacific Ocean. (Photo credit: Paul Yancey)

The sinking carcasses of fish from near-surface waters deliver toxic mercury pollution to the most remote and inaccessible parts of the world’s oceans, including the deepest spot of all: the 36,000-foot-deep Mariana Trench in the northwest Pacific Ocean. And most of that mercury began its long journey to the deep-sea trenches as atmospheric emissions from coal-fired power plants, mining operations, cement factories, incinerators and other human activities. Those are two of the main conclusions of a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, co-authored by University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researchers Jeffrey Drazen and Brian Popp.

Mercury is a naturally occurring element, but more than 2,000 metric tons of it are emitted into the atmosphere each year from human activities. This anthropogenic mercury enters the oceans via rainfall, dry deposition of windblown dust, and runoff from rivers and estuaries.

researcher dissecting a snail
Former SOEST graduate student Mackenzie Gerringer dissects a snailfish. (Photo credit: Chloe Weinstock)
shrimp
Shrimp-like crustaceans called amphipods collected from the Mariana Trench. (Photo credit: Paul Yancey)

Once there, marine microorganisms convert some of it to methylmercury, a highly toxic organic form that can accumulate in fish to levels that are harmful to humans and wildlife.

The research team, led by Joel Blum of the University of Michigan, collected snailfish and crustaceans called amphipods from depths of up to 33,630 feet in the Mariana Trench near Guam and from depths of up to 32,800 feet in the Kermadec Trench near New Zealand.

“These samples were challenging to acquire, given the trenches’ great depths and high pressures,” said Drazen, an oceanographer in UH Mānoa’s School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST). “The trenches are some of the least studied ecosystems on Earth, and the Mariana snailfish was only just discovered in 2014.”

Mercury fingerprinting techniques

Mercury has seven different non-radioactive isotopes which provide a unique chemical signature, or fingerprint, that can be used as a diagnostic tool to compare environmental samples from various locations. The researchers used these fingerprinting techniques to determine that the mercury from deep-sea-trench amphipods and snailfish had a chemical signature that matched the mercury from a wide range of fish species in the central Pacific that feed at depths of around 1,600 feet.

They concluded that most of the mercury in the trench organisms was transported there in the carcasses of fish that feed in near-surface waters, where most of the mercury comes from anthropogenic sources.

While mercury emissions have declined in recent years in North America and Europe, China and India continue to expand their use of coal, and global-scale mercury emissions are rising.

“Our new study provides critical information to understand how changing global mercury emissions will affect the levels found in seafood,” said Popp, Earth scientist in SOEST.

For more see SOEST’s website.

–By Marcie Grabowski

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UH Mānoa athletes remain consistent in graduation success rate https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2020/11/17/manoa-athletics-consistent-graduation-success-rate/ Wed, 18 Nov 2020 02:07:12 +0000 https://www.hawaii.edu/news/?p=130788 The ‘Bows have scored 85 or better in the last four NCAA GSR reports.

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student-athlete graduates

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Athletics Department has maintained a steady student-athlete Graduation Success Rate (GSR) for the 2019–20 school year. In the latest GSR report by the NCAA, the ‘Bows posted a score of 85%, which fell one point from last year’s all-time high of 86.

UH Mānoa has scored 85 or better in each of the past four reporting cycles. The Athletic Department’s score throughout the years has risen from its initial rate of 60% in 2004–05 to 83% in 2015–16.

Among its peers, UH Mānoa tied for fifth along with UC Irvine among schools in the Big West Conference behind UC Davis, Long Beach State, UC Santa Barbara and Cal Poly. Among the Mountain West schools in football, UH Mānoa scored a 71, which ranked eighth.

Five UH Mānoa sports earned perfect GSR scores, and eight programs posted scores higher or equal to their respective sports’ national average:

  • Baseball (92; national average: 84)
  • Men’s golf (100; 89)
  • Men’s tennis (100; 92)
  • Women’s basketball (92; 91)
  • Cross country/track and field (100; 91)
  • Women’s golf (100; 95)
  • Women’s tennis (100; 95)
  • Softball (92; 92)

For more information, visit the UH Athletics website.

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